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Lake life

It’s a log…perch?

One day, my fishing buddy George reared back and set the hook on his bass rod. It bent  double. After reeling (with a loose drag, I might add) for a few minutes, whipping his rod from right to left and then just finally holding it still, he said sheepishly, “Oh, man, he hung me up.”

Yeah, right. I’ve seen that before. A “log” bass.

“No, I really had one,” he said. “Honest”. Hillary would have been proud. I refused to look for teeth marks near the head of the six-inch black plastic worm despite several pleas from George. There is no such thing as a logbass.

IMG_2172On the other hand, there is such a thing as a logperch.

I know. On a separate trip, I caught one. With two credible witnesses, mind you. I hooked the little two-inch dude in the mouth, too. On a three-inch shiner.You can choose to give credit to the incredible feel of my B’n’M jig pole or to my incredible feel while fishing live bait.

The little fish looked like a baby walleye. Not that I’ve ever seen a baby walleye. But I think that’s what a baby walleye would look like. He was obviously too small to filet or even eat whole, so after a quick Apple moment (that’s a modern day Kodak moment), he was released back into the water.

For the sake of science, I immediately text messaged (couldn’t do that with a Kodak) a photo to my good fishery biologist expert friend Mike Wood. He cleared up the matter.

“The little mystery fish you have there is a logperch,” Mike texted back .  “They’re a cool little fish in the darter family.  The one in the picture is full grown, though some do get a little bigger than that.  D’Arbonne has an abundant population, but they’re seldom seen because they stay on the bottom all the time.”
For those of you you (gasp!) think I might actually make something like this up (never!), here’s a link for more information.
 http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/factsheet.aspx?SpeciesID=821
“By the way, logperch are pretty bland compared to their show-off cousins,” Mike added.  The link below give a few examples, including the Crole Darter.  This beautiful little guy lives unseen in small creeks right behind lot of Union Parish residents houses.”

https://www.google.com/search?q=creole+darter&sa=X&biw=1093&bih=508&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ved=0ahUKEwi__b7w8d_NAhXDNSYKHTr_APUQsAQIJw&dpr=1.25

Today’s lakedarbonnelife.com fishing lesson is now over. Please remain calm and return to your normal duties.

EDITOR’S NOTE:  If you think this is something, just wait until my next post. You won’t believe what I caught in D’Arbonne last week …with a stick, no less..

 

 

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